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2017 Reading Challenge

Jill Elizabeth has read 2 books toward her goal of 150 books.
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Introduction to Forgotten Reflections and Interview with Author Young-Im Lee

Today I’m delighted to introduce you to a marvelous new author and her piece of historical fiction – Forgotten Reflections – about courageous women during the Korean War.

The Book
In the current international climate where North Korea takes center stage, “Forgotten Reflections” weaves an inspirational tale of family, lost memories, folklore and an unforgotten history, spanning three generations as South Korea rises from the ashes.

DARE TO DREAM IN THE MIDST OF WAR.

1945. Rice fields seem endless in a quaint farming village of South Korea, yet Iseul and the villagers have been on the verge of starvation for as long as they can remember; the last of their Japanese colonizers have taken every last grain with them. In the newly independent Korea, Iseul dreams of what her future might bring. Yet, war is on the horizon, and the boy she has fallen for is an alleged North Korean communist spy.
Continue reading Introduction to Forgotten Reflections and Interview with Author Young-Im Lee

Book Review: How Existentialism Almost Killed Me by Michael Bernhart

I met Mike Bernhart, the author of this delightful romp that brings you through the killing fields of the Khmers Rouges by way of drug counterfeiters and a Thai elephant sanctuary, earlier this year when he asked me to review an earlier installment in his exceedingly entertaining Max Brown Tetralogy. I enjoyed it – and talking with the author – so much that I asked if the other books in the series were available. I was promptly sent How Existentialism Almost Killed Me: Kierkegaard was Right, the fourth book (as well as the first two, which I will get to in due course), with the explanation that it continued Max and Sally’s saga and was right in my wheelhouse (I used to work in Big Pharma and drug counterfeiting is a topic that I’m sadly all too familiar with as a result). So I dove in – and once I did, found I could not put the book down…
Continue reading Book Review: How Existentialism Almost Killed Me by Michael Bernhart

Interview with Terence Harkin, Author of The Big Buddha Bicycle Race

An Interview with Author Terence A. Harkin

Can you tell us a little about the book?
Well, the setting is upcountry Thailand and war-ravaged Laos late in the Vietnam War. On one level it’s a cross-cultural wartime love story. That means exploring Asian-American cultural misunderstanding on the personal level, which can be painful, and on the large scale, where it proved to be catastrophic, especially for the people of Laos, which was devastated by the war and then forgotten.

It’s also a surreal remembrance of two groups who have been erased from American history—the active-duty soldiers who risked prison by taking part in the GI anti-war movement and the air commandos who risked death night after night flying over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. In The Big Buddha Bicycle Race, the twain meet.

“An excellent, thoughtful book about the Vietnam War.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Continue reading Interview with Terence Harkin, Author of The Big Buddha Bicycle Race

Interview: John Anthony Miller, Author of All the King’s Soldiers


Today I’m pleased to bring you some thoughts and insights from John Anthony Miller, author of the historical novel All the King’s Soldiers. I have my copy on hand and a review will follow at some point in the future, but I wanted to introduce you to this talented individual and his very intriguing book without delay. So without further ado, I bring you John Anthony Miller!

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Interview with John Anthony Miller

What was your goal with this book?
When I started All the King’s Soldiers, I wanted to cross genres and create a WWII thriller that was also a murder mystery. Consistent with all my books (All the King’s Soldiers is my fourth), I also wanted to treat the location as a character, and set the story in a place not normally associated with WWII. I chose Lisbon, Portugal which, as a neutral city, was also a thriving hotbed for international espionage.

A common theme to my novels are ordinary people compelled to do extra-ordinary things – against the backdrop of global conflicts. For All the King’s Soldiers, I created Simon Cole, a London code analyst who’s sent to Lisbon to find the killer of a British agent, determine the identity of a double agent, and recover a stolen copy of the German invasion plans for England. Woefully unprepared and mismatched against a German master spy, he races to recover the plans, solve his colleague’s murder, and find the double agent – even if it’s the woman he loves. Continue reading Interview: John Anthony Miller, Author of All the King’s Soldiers

Book Review: The Address by Fiona Davis

I just love Fiona Davis’s books – this is the second one that I’ve read that is devoted to the history and stories behind a famous New York City building, and I really love the construct. There is so much fascinating history in old buildings, particularly in a city like New York, where the good, the bad, and the famous have long strode the streets and halls…

In this book, Davis takes on the iconic Dakota – the apartment building that expanded the boundaries of “acceptable” high-end New York housing AND witnessed the cold-blooded murder of John Lennon. The building is a character in its own right. I think this is one of the magical gifts that Davis brings to her books. Continue reading Book Review: The Address by Fiona Davis

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